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Summary:

No tissues shall be transferred into the body of another person by means of transplantation, unless the donor of the tissues has been screened and found nonreactive by laboratory tests for evidence of infection with HIV, HBV and HCV (viral hepatitis), HTLV, and syphilis. The State Department of Health Services may adopt regulations requiring additional screening tests of donors of tissues when, the action is necessary for the protection of the public, donors, or recipients. Donors for tissue transplants must be screened by laboratory tests for HIV, viral hepatitis (HBV and HCV), and syphilis; and when applicable, for human T lympotrophic virus (HTLV). Such tissues can be transferred into the body of another person only if the donors test negative for infection. The State Department of Health Services may adopt regulations requiring additional screening tests of donors of tissues when necessary for the protection of the public, donors, or recipients.

Summary:

Owners and laboratory directors of all clinical laboratories shall preserve medical records and laboratory records, as defined in this section, for three years from the date of testing, examination, or purchase. Failure to retain records accordingly is cause of legal action. Information in these medical records shall be confidential, with certain exceptions.

Summary:

The laboratory that is storing a blood sample shall provide access to the blood sample only to (1) a person who has been adopted pursuant to this part, (2) the adoptive parent of a person under the age of 18 years, (3) the birth parents. No person other than the adoptive parent and the adopted child shall have access to the blood sample or any DNA test results related to the blood sample, unless the adoptive parent or the child authorizes another person or entity to have that access.

Summary:

Exemptions from Public Records Act disclosure include confidentiality in blood tests of hepatitis and AIDS carriers.

Summary:

Workers that handle pesticides must be tested regularly for pesticide poisoning; the test administered is a cholinesterase test. A laboratory that performs cholinesterase testing must report an illness to the Department of Pesticide Regulation. The laboratory's report must contain: the test results in IU/ml, the purpose of the test, the name and date of birth of the person tested, the contact information of the person tested and their employer. The medical professional ordering the test must ensure that the person tested receives a copy of the cholinesterase test results within 14 days. The information in the report must be held confidential. The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Department of Pesticide Regulation, and State Department of Public Health may share the information with the county agricultural commissioner or local health officer for the purpose of surveillance, case management, investigation, environmental remediation and abatement.

Summary:

The Department of Health Services shall establish (1) a list of reportable diseases and conditions to be properly reported by the health officer, and (2) a list of communicable diseases and conditions for which clinical laboratories shall submit a culture or a specimen to the local public health laboratory and the State Public Health Laboratory. The laboratory report shall be submitted electronically in a manner specified by the department; laboratories that receive incomplete patient information may report the name of the provider who submitted the request to the local health officer.

Summary:

Commencing July 1, 2009, or within one year of the establishment of a state electronic laboratory reporting system, whichever is later, a report of a reportable disease or condition generated by a laboratory shall be submitted electronically in a manner specified by the Department of Public Health. This electronic reporting requirement shall not apply to reports of HIV infections. The department shall allow laboratories that receive incomplete patient information to report the name of the provider who submitted the request to the local health officer.

Summary:

The blood specimen obtained from a pregnant woman must be submitted to a laboratory for a syphilis test.

Summary:

The laboratory conducting the syphilis screening of prenatal blood samples shall report results to the Department of Health, which may destroy the results after two years.

Summary:

All laboratory reports for prenatal syphilis tests are confidential and not available for public inspection.

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