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Summary:

The coroner is authorized to assist medical and health service agencies in identifying donors of human organs and tissues, for purposes of providing life-enhancing benefits of transplant surgery to recipients under duly sanctioned medical conditions.

Summary:

Exemptions from Public Records Act disclosure include confidentiality regarding donor not being natural father in records on artificial insemination, attorney-client confidential communications.

Summary:

The Director of Health Services must develop and implement a hepatitis C awareness program that attempts to coordinate with national efforts related to identifying and notifying persons who received blood from hepatitis c virus positive donors.

Summary:

Prior to a donation of blood or blood components, each donor shall be notified in writing of that the blood will be tested for HIV and that the donor will be notified of confirmed positive test results.

Summary:

If a blood given by a blood donor is found to be reactive for HIV antibodies and the blood bank's reasonable efforts have failed to locate the donor, the test results may be disclosed to a local health officer to locate and notify the donor of a reactive result. No civil liability or criminal sanction shall be imposed for disclosure of test results. Upon completion of the local health officer's efforts to locate and notify the donor, all records obtained from the blood bank or plasma center, including any individual identifying information or test results, shall be expunged by the local health officer.

Summary:

No tissues shall be transferred into the body of another person by means of transplantation, unless the donor of the tissues has been screened and found nonreactive by laboratory tests for evidence of infection with HIV, HBV and HCV (viral hepatitis), HTLV, and syphilis. The State Department of Health Services may adopt regulations requiring additional screening tests of donors of tissues when, the action is necessary for the protection of the public, donors, or recipients. Donors for tissue transplants must be screened by laboratory tests for HIV, viral hepatitis (HBV and HCV), and syphilis; and when applicable, for human T lympotrophic virus (HTLV). Such tissues can be transferred into the body of another person only if the donors test negative for infection. The State Department of Health Services may adopt regulations requiring additional screening tests of donors of tissues when necessary for the protection of the public, donors, or recipients.

Summary:

(2) A recipient of sperm may consent to therapeutic insemination of sperm or use of sperm in other assisted reproductive technologies even if the sperm donor is found reactive for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, HIV, or HTLV if the sperm donor is the spouse of, partner of, or designated donor for that recipient. The physician providing insemination or assisted reproductive technology services shall advise the donor and recipient of the potential medical risks associated with receiving sperm from a reactive donor. The donor and the recipient shall sign a document affirming that each comprehends the potential medical risks of using sperm from a reactive donor for the proposed procedure and that each consents to it. Copies of the document shall be placed in the medical records of the donor and the recipient. . . . (3)(B)(IV) The recommendations made within the "Guidelines for Reducing the Risk of Viral Transmission During Fertility Treatment" published by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine regarding followup testing for HIV and HTLV after use of sperm from an HIV or HTLV reactive donor and have the recommendations regarding followup testing be documented in the recipient's medical record. (iv) The physician providing insemination or assisted reproductive technology services shall also verify, and document in the recipient' s medical record, that the donor of sperm who tests reactive for HIV or HTLV is under the care of a physician managing the HIV or HTLV. (v) The physician providing insemination or assisted reproductive technology services shall recommend to the physician who will be providing ongoing care to the recipient recommended followup testing for HIV and HTLV according to the "Guidelines for Reducing the Risk of Viral Transmission During Fertility Treatment" published by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, which shall be documented in the recipient's medical record.

Summary:

A procurement organization is allowed reasonable access to information in the records of the Donate Life California Organ and Tissue Donor Registry to ascertain if an individual at or near death is a donor. Personally identifiable information on the donor registry shall not be used nor disclosed without the express consent of the donor for purposes outside ascertaining whether the individual has made, amended, or revoked an anatomical gift. Additionally, the procurement organization shall not sell the information and must comply with all state and federal laws protecting personally identifiable information.

Keywords:
donor information
Summary:

When a hospital refers an individual at or near death to a procurement organization, the organization may conduct any reasonable examination necessary to ensure the medical suitability of the anatomical gift. Additionally, the person to whom a part passes under Health & Safety Code 7150.50 may conduct any reasonable examination necessary to ensure the medical suitability of the body or part for its intended purpose. Such examinations may include a review of all medical and dental records of the donor or prospective donor.

Keywords:
donor information
Summary:

If a prospective donor has a declaration or advance health care directive whose terms are in conflict with the administration of measures necessary to ensure the medical suitability of a part, the prospective donor and attending physician shall confer to resolve the conflict.

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