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Summary:

A law enforcement employee who believes that she came into contact with the bodily fluids of an inmate, a person arrested or taken into custody, a person charged with a crime, or a person on parole or probation must report the incident to the chief medical officer. The law enforcement employee may also request an HIV or hepatitis B or C test of the person.

Summary:

The chief medical officer may require HIV or hepatitis B or C testing for subjects of reports even if not requested by the reporting law enforcement employee, if she believes there is a significant risk of infection given the nature of the employee's contact with the subject's bodily fluids.

Summary:

An inmate in a correctional institution or juvenile facility may request an HIV or hepatitis B or C test of another inmate if he believes that he came into contact with the bodily fluids of that inmate. The chief medical officer shall decide on whether to submit inmate to mandatory testing. In the case of a minor in a juvenile facility, the facility must notify the parent of minor to be tested and obtain permission for testing.

Summary:

The chief medical officer may order an HIV or hepatitis test of an inmate if she decides there are clinical symptoms of HIV infection, AIDS, or hepatitis B or C. A copy of such decision must be given to the inmate and to parents when the inmate is a minor.

Summary:

A correctional institution employee may file a written report with the chief medical officer upon observing or being informed of an occurrence of an activity classified as causing the transmission of the AIDS virus. The chief medical officer may investigate the report to determine whether there was a likely exchange of bodily fluids that could result in the transmission of AIDS. Upon such a determination, the chief medical officer may require HIV testing of affected inmates.

Summary:

Upon the release of an inmate from a correctional institution, a medical representative of the institution shall notify the inmate's parole or probation officer that the inmate has tested positive for HIV, or has been diagnosed as having AIDS or hepatitis B and C.

Summary:

When a parole or probation officer learns from responsible medical authorities that a parolee or probationer has HIV, hepatitis B or C, but that parolee has not told his or her spouse, the officer may ensure that this information is reaches the spouse through the chief medical officer of the institution or the physician or surgeon treating the spouse.

Summary:

If the parole or probation officer has received information from appropriate medical authorities that one of the parolees or probationers in custody has HIV, AIDS, hepatitis B or C and a record of assault on a peace officer and the officer seeks the aid of local law enforcement to apprehend or take the parolee/probationer into custody, the officer shall inform those assisting of the person's medical condition. Local law enforcement officers receiving information pursuant to this subdivision shall maintain confidentiality of the information received.

Summary:

Correctional institution medical personnel must notify all law enforcement employees who have had direct contact with bodily fluids of inmates, persons charged, or persons in custody who have tested HIV positive or diagnosed as having AIDS or hepatitis B or C. Law enforcement employees reporting incidents of bodily fluid contact shall be notified of results of persons tested because of such reports.

Summary:

HIV/AIDS/hepatitis test results for inmate are to be sent to the medical officer ordering them; the laboratory is responsible for ensuring the confidentiality of test results.

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